AndyG’s NMM Rust Technique

Today ToadChapel is proud to present a tutorial from the amazing Andy Gillaspy, aka AndyG. Andy is a true master of NMM style painting, but he’s always pushing himself in new directions. In that spirit, Andy has developed a way to render heavy rust in a non-metallic setting.  Read on to learn how to add this technique to your bag of tricks. Thanks Andy!

AndyG's beautiful Wraith from Black Crow Miniatures

I adore non-metallic metals. It’s my favourite way of painting metals. The control on where the highlighting goes, the matte finish which stops unwanted glints from metallic paints so that the mini appears to the observer the way that you want it to rather than how the lighting in the room reflects offs metallic paints is for me worth the effort. This isn’t to say that TMM is not an exacting and difficult way of painting metals well; for example the work of SkellettetS and Megazord Man is superb and they use TMM most of the time.

That said, NMM for me. However, what to do with rust? There I have previously given in and used TMM rather than NMM and I have been very satisfied with the results; the slight application in rubbed spots of the metal concentrates the highlights where you want them anyway so the issues of glints appearing where you don’t want them doesn’t occur as the rest of the metal is oxidized with matte browns and oranges. It was quite a challenge to come out of my comfort zone and decide to see if I could paint realistic and aesthetically pleasing rusted armour with NMM. Continue reading “AndyG’s NMM Rust Technique”

Grow the Land

I’ve been building up the layers on my Yarry base. I felt that he needed to be in a fairly lush, healthy woodland environment. Middle Earth is the obvious point of reference (especially for a hobbit), and I wanted him somewhere wilder than the Shire but not so gloomy & forbidding as Mirkwood. Troll country, I guess.

Here’s the state of the base. There will be a few more additions, I think, but nothing major, I think. Read on for some WIP shots of how I created this scene. Continue reading “Grow the Land”

Effective Highlights and Painting Different Material Finishes

The great David Powell , aka Bailey03, joins us for this guest tutorial, explaining how to better paint highlights and surface reflections. Though David is a sublime figure painter, he’s also a remarkable teacher who always translates his ideas into practical advice.  Read on for David’s tips that will immediately improve your mini painting. Oh, and to see some of his incredible work, too!

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David Powell's fearsome black orc (an academic bust from Hera Models) glares at the viewer. There is a subtle interplay of highlights between a universal light sourse and OSL cast by a fire.

When I work with other painters, an area I often try to stress is how to properly paint highlights. Continue reading “Effective Highlights and Painting Different Material Finishes”

On the Road at Last

I’ve been working on my Random Encounter for a long time, but lately I’ve been motivated and enjoying the effort of trying to create a display piece that reflects my current abilities well.

At last I’ve started on a base. He’ll be walking on a deserted road, caught unawares- but not unarmed- by some unseen… what? That’s for you to decide. Continue reading “On the Road at Last”

Four-Banger!

I stumbled across a flyer yesterday and today I visited Tricon, a show put on by the local chapter of IPMS. The people were great and I made some new friends.

Though most of the show was dedicated to ordinance, cars, airplanes, ships, and larger scale models & busts, my 28mm offerings did very well, earning four gold medals in an open judging competition.

I had a great time and look forward to visiting again next year. I’ll try to bring a few friends to increase the visibility of 28mm models, and also prepare some pieces that jive more with the overall settings of the show.

Woohoo!

Eldritch Elf: 12 XII 18

Let’s get a little light on this situation!

There’s little left to do on this fun project. Most important had been the painting of the illuminated portions of the lamp.

My idea was to use pointillism to create a weird but not immediately implausible effect. I wanted the light to look dingy. I also wanted the lamp to function almost like a black hole, sucking most of the light around it into itself. Hopefully the chiaroscuro makes a bit more sense now!

The lamp is painted sort of reverse OSL, I guess, where the object emits light only directionally.

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The lamp’s light is oriented down toward the scene directly before the viewer, where the slimey runoff also meets your eyes. Lovecraft describes the building as tall, so I wanted the space to be distended vertically. Even though the scene is tiny, you can still create a sense of imposing bulk. The goal is simply to create the impression that we stand before Gilman House, confronted with the loathsome prospect of a night within its walls. I find that clear ideas such as these free up the problem solving parts of your brain to discover & explore creative opportunities.

Eldritch Elf: 10 XII 18

The weather in Innsmouth is pretty soupy. The locals like it that way.

Our humble public house, a subtle fluorescent glow emanating from around the door…

Whoa. Ugly brown stains. These were done with ink.

And green stains, too. I used enamels for these.

I’m quite pleased with the patinated bronze. You can perhaps see I added an optically impossible shift toward more and brighter patina on the portion of the lamp that points away from the viewer & scene.

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All these strange visual tricks & mixed styles hopefully help create an interesting piece with a Lovecraftian feel. You can see the light effects on the door (which could definitely be better) are sketched in as if with a pencil, the slime in the street is painted like a cartoon, the enamels themselves are applied fairly naturalistically (though what’s underneath is unrealistic), and the whole thing is rigged for fluorescent illumination.

These kinds of quick & crazy projects offer great opportunities to throw yourself into new techniques (and make up your own) and try your best to capture a mood, an insight, a joke, or whatever.

And we’ll leave it there for tonight. See you soon.