5 Ways to Achieve Contrast in Your Painting

The great John Margiotta, aka BloodASmedium, visits ToadChapel to explore the concepts in contrast which have led him to countless major awards, including Golden Demon, Crystal Brush, and more over his career as a mini painter.

A grotesque nurgle figure from Games Workshop's Age of Sigmar
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Oxide & Patina Technique Step by Step Part 3: Pulling the Scheme Together

Here Hairster concludes his masterclass on painting verdigris & weathering on your minis.

Introducing the third part of Hairster's painting tutorial on patina and oxide effects.

Continue reading “Oxide & Patina Technique Step by Step Part 3: Pulling the Scheme Together”

Oxide & Patina Technique Step by Step Part 2: Building up the Patina

Here’s Part 2 of Hairster’s step-by-step guide on how to paint the amazing patina effect on his Necron Doom Scythe.

Introducing the second part of Hairster's painting tutorial.

Continue reading “Oxide & Patina Technique Step by Step Part 2: Building up the Patina”

Oxide & Patina Technique Step by Step Part 1: Laying Down the Basecoats

This very special guest tutorial comes to you courtesy of Phil Pryce, aka Hairster.  He is one of my favorite painters and has developed some impressive original techniques over recent years.  In this three-part lesson Phil reveals his secrets for an amazingly rich and realistic verdigris effect.

You can check out more of Phil’s work on Instagram.

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Welcome to Hairster's tutorial on painting oxide and patina effects.

Continue reading “Oxide & Patina Technique Step by Step Part 1: Laying Down the Basecoats”

RuNnNNnN!!

This sprinting sergeant is slowly making his way across my work desk.

He’s got an auspex and a boltgun, perfect for hiding in the back and farming command points like a coward brilliant strategist.

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Though I’ve managed to keep busy at the hobby, it’s been tough slogging lately with work, family, and flagging motivation all conspiring to sap my productivity. When I find myself in a funk, I try to keep engaged with my projects by e.g. writing for the website, building & converting figures to paint down the road, starting a terrain project, or even just reading a 40k novel in the evening. I never want my hobby to feel like a job or, worse, a chore, but I also don’t want to find myself wishing for time back that I wasted on something less rewarding. I think one of the great things about modeling & painting is the fact that you have something to show for your efforts when you’re finished, and sometimes you can gain a sense of pride simply because you persevered through a project when you might easily have quit.

Random Encounter: Spotty Shirt

I’ve got the shirt on my dwarf about where I want it and shaded the socks & pantaloons.

The shirt’s done with pointillism to give it a very different texture to the surrounding textiles. Though the shadows are quite deep, I haven’t pushed the highlights extremely high. This will create the impression of a soft fabric that doesn’t reflect much light.

Random Encounter

Here’s a figure I’ve had on the back burner for a long time. I was so inspired by some of the work at MFCA that I wanted to get back to some display painting. I’ve still got plenty to do for gaming & narrative purposes, but I’ve been enjoying the competitions lately and I want to put together some pieces that showcase my current abilities.

It’s the classic ‘Random Encounter’ by FeR miniatures. Just put in some work on the skin, trying to do my best. Matt DiPietro told me to “paint boldly”, so I’m giving it a go.

MFCA

I’m back from the 2019 MFCA show in Philadelphia. I earned two bronze medals for my pieces.

Considering the quality of the entries, I was pleased with the result.

My favorite work on display was Matt DiPietro‘s bust of Conan, painted in a Frazetta style. I got to talk to Matt for about an hour. He is a great person. We talked about techniques, his business as a full-time painter, and his experiences getting to where he is now.

Many of the historical pieces were mind blowing. The techniques and stylistic norms are quite different from what I’m used to, but those old heads do know how to paint!

This incredible scratchbuilt masterpiece was voted a deserving best in show.

I got to meet many great folks, and spent an enjoyable day in the company of painters eager to share our love of mini painting. I’m hoping I get back to the show next year.