Weird Document Discovered in Desk of Miskatonic Professor

Following his disappearance in the Summer/Fall of 1939, a strange document was discovered in the desk of Dr. Hans Peter Alter of Miskatonic University’s Biology Dept. It was a simple anatomical diagram of the kind one would expect among the professional effects of a renowned man of science. Clearly related to subject 20.XI.19, the document stands out for two particular reasons.

Continue reading “Weird Document Discovered in Desk of Miskatonic Professor”

The Lesser Butterfly

This bizarre organism floats through the nanosphere on delicate ‘wings’. With these vascular structures X. fur, known as the lesser butterfly, both eats and breathes.

The reproductive method of X. fur is ingenious and unique. It captures and ingests the globules of other organisms, then slowly converts the foreign genetic material to match its own. Through a process of forced and controlled mutation, the globule becomes a viable egg of the butterfly. Once conversion is complete, the egg, now an entirely different species than before, is ejected to develop on its new course.

The Enigma

One of the most bizarre microbes yet documented by researchers using the revolutionary aether field nanoscope is HP 1939. The true nature of ‘the enigma’ is unknown: though superficially artificial in morphology and behavior, no known process of manufacture could produce the apparent complexity of HP 1939 on this scale.

A nanotechnological organism known as 'the enigma'. The organism inserts a complex, non-standard code into host DNA.
The enigma defies all known rules of biology.

HP 1939 can best be described as a unique type of benign and self-stabilizing carcinogenic cell. The enigma inserts strings of diverse code into the DNA of nearby cells, which then create a finite number of copies of themselves. This apparently genetic information, though legible to most species of all biological kingdoms, does not employ the four nucleotide bases of the canonical code, but rather a complex, almost syntactical system that varies from one specimen to another. Many of the amino acids produced by this ‘enigmatical’ code are unknown elsewhere in the catalogue of terrestrial life.

After a brief period of replication, the altered cells form a cluster around HP 1939. Once the microbe has entered its chrysalis, as it is fancifully known, it ceased interaction with the host and begins faintly emitting a complex but regular electromagnetic signal.

The means of reproduction of this fascinating organism remain a mystery to researchers.

Lovecraft-Inspired Microbes Everywhere!

I’ve been having fun drawing these little portraits of imaginary microfauna, so here comes another one. These are quick, fun little illustrations I can crank out in a couple of hours. It would be cool to do enough that I have a sort of handmade bestiary of tiny monsters.

An illustration of a germ inspired by Lovecraft's Yog Sothoth.
These globules can pop into existence, seemingly from nowhere.

This one has a pretty obvious Yog Sothoth vibe. He’s cute, but that’s some serious stuff. Don’t want to catch it. Or rather… don’t want it to catch you!

If you’d like to see some WIP shots, I’ve included a few below. Plus a small goodie.

Continue reading “Lovecraft-Inspired Microbes Everywhere!”