Another Base without a Face

I’ve found time here and there to complete another little vignette. This one features a dead tree, which I haven’t done in a while.  As usual, this one is a kind of lesson to be applied in basing minis, as well as a little imaginative refuge in its own right.

A detaile base featuring a forest scene without a miniature.

The base is 1.5″ square. I like the challenge of telling a story or creating a scene dense in interesting details on a very small scale. Continue reading “Another Base without a Face”

5 Ways to Achieve Contrast in Your Painting

The great John Margiotta, aka BloodASmedium, visits ToadChapel to explore the concepts in contrast which have led him to countless major awards, including Golden Demon, Crystal Brush, and more over his career as a mini painter.

A grotesque nurgle figure from Games Workshop's Age of Sigmar
Continue reading “5 Ways to Achieve Contrast in Your Painting”

Oxide & Patina Technique Step by Step Part 2: Building up the Patina

Here’s Part 2 of Hairster’s step-by-step guide on how to paint the amazing patina effect on his Necron Doom Scythe.

Introducing the second part of Hairster's painting tutorial.

Continue reading “Oxide & Patina Technique Step by Step Part 2: Building up the Patina”

Dark Angels Tabletop Painting Tutorial

I’ve followed a straightforward and consistent method in painting the Dark Angels for my 40k Kill Team.  This produces a uniform look to my squad, even though the individual members have been painted over many months.  I’ve done my figures one-by-one, since they’re each kitbashed & converted to create a unique personality for each, but this painting process would work equally well for batch painting.  Moreover, the steps I employ can be applied to any Space Marine chapter, or indeed any 40k army.  In this process I paint full faces (yes, for my whole command roster) and carefully pick out the many details added through conversion, but much of the mini is painted quickly and easily in a very elementary manner.  I find that by drawing attention to the most important and interesting elements on the miniature, the lack of careful blending or other advanced techniques is easily forgiven, especially on the tabletop.  This approach also gives a great opportunity to practice important skills, like painting faces, before you tackle that Commander you really want to nail.  Kill Team, with its limited roster, offers a perfect opportunity to go nuts on conversion, detailing, and faces, without actually painting models to a display standard.

An enraged Dark Angels space marine charging with bolter raised.

Here I’ll paint up a Tactical Marine, demonstrating each step of the process. Continue reading “Dark Angels Tabletop Painting Tutorial”