Week in the Woods (11 I 20)

Freezing temperatures gave way to an afternoon near 70 degrees on Saturday, ensuring that Cassie & I would find time to explore a few of our favorite trails. We had a good day hunting mushrooms & other interesting stuff!

I brought my macro lens into the woods again, something I just started doing but now feel I almost can’t do without. I’ve come to really enjoy it, and today got some fun shots of a few miniature beauties, such as these… I’m not sure whats. I’ll watch to see if they grow. Maybe they’re some sort of tooth fungus. I love their frilly lace hemline!

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Another Round of Pixie Cups

Of course my new favorite lichens were so rad that I had to draw some more.

This little drawing uses colored pencils, where I had used Copics for color the first time. In the past several months I’ve used this set up (microns, white gel pen, and colored pencil) for my Lovecraftian microbes, but not for real subjects. It’s what I had on hand, though, and it worked out great.

I’ll definitely be drawing these again, I’m sure. I’d like to find some more so I have more reference material!

Microbial Mind Control

X. mesmer is an endoparasite, but also a remarkable kind of reproductive predator. It seems to exhibit a degree of executive control or ‘mind control’ over its host organism.

The snaky pink tentacles of the hideous monster burst from within the body of its host organism.

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Weird Document Discovered in Desk of Miskatonic Professor

Following his disappearance in the Summer/Fall of 1939, a strange document was discovered in the desk of Dr. Hans Peter Alter of Miskatonic University’s Biology Dept. It was a simple anatomical diagram of the kind one would expect among the professional effects of a renowned man of science. Clearly related to subject 20.XI.19, the document stands out for two particular reasons.

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The Lesser Butterfly

This bizarre organism floats through the nanosphere on delicate ‘wings’. With these vascular structures X. fur, known as the lesser butterfly, both eats and breathes.

The reproductive method of X. fur is ingenious and unique. It captures and ingests the globules of other organisms, then slowly converts the foreign genetic material to match its own. Through a process of forced and controlled mutation, the globule becomes a viable egg of the butterfly. Once conversion is complete, the egg, now an entirely different species than before, is ejected to develop on its new course.

Shai-Hulud

Though many of the strange lifeforms revealed by Dr. Alter and his team in those feverish months of research pose no threat to macroscopic organisms, an alarming number can harm us in ways we are presently powerless to combat.

A monster straight from horror, or from Dune, approaches a floating globule with threefold jaws spread wide.

The ‘worm’, as it is often called, swims within the bloodstream of mammals, burrowing into red blood cells, where it hunts hemoglobin. The semi-rigid segments nearest the mouth each sport three spines, which serve as a kind of lateral line to detect aetheric disturbances created by organic molecules. When shai-hulud grows too numerous within its host, that individual may suffer shortness of breath, weakness, and an unhealthy pallor.